Blog Archives

VCSO FILM 04 : SLIDE

VSCO film tools has long been creating what we believe to be the best film emulsion presets for digital photographers. Last Wednesday, the company announced Film Pack 4: Slide, a new pack of emulators that help photographers recreate the look of various slide film stocks in digital photos. It’s “the most authentic film emulation available,” the company says.

VSCOBANNER

The pack includes 11 different films (with variations of each), and a total of 117 presets.

films

The software is available for Lightroom (4/5) and Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop (CS6/CC). VSCO Film Pack 4 also brings some other, more general improvements to the plugin. It features more custom camera profiles, including Fuji, Nikon, Canon, Sony, Olympus and Leica models, and an increased range of blues and blacks for VSCO Tools.

You can get VSCO Film 04 here. The normal price is $119, but you will get 25% discount for limited time. As an owner of previous VSCO Film packs, they offered 50% off until 20th August 2013.

Here are some result of using VSCO Film 04.

Fuji Astia 100F-

Kodak E100G HC

Fuji Fortia SP

Fuji Provia 400X+++

Picture Control on Camera & Lightroom Preview

This issue has been occured to me for several years when i started using lightroom.

Did you notice that when we shoot in RAW and we did (for nikon) set picture control for example; Landscape, Vivid, Portrait, Monotone,.. etc, just after few second the imported those images in our lightroom library, it will become dull, but it appears to be fine (images with picture control setting) few seconds earlier?

If you never notice this before, try this:

1. Shoot in RAW with Monotone setting on Picture Control

2. Import images in Lightroom

3. You will notice, all images viewed in black and white as we see in our camera LCD

4. After done importing and collecting data of that image, Lightroom will generate their own preview which the black and white image to be replaced.

5. You should get what i mean by now 🙂

I never bother this issue before, but i keep on wondering why does lightroom did not read the picture control setting. Here’s my findings:

1. Does Picture Control adjustment have any effect when shooting in raw mode?

No. The Picture Control settings are stored as metadata within the NEF file. If you open the NEF in Capture NX 2, then the values are applied, but of course you can change them. In ViewNX, I think you have to press the RAW button to see the full effects of any picture control settings.

I believe that pressing the RAW button opens the RAW image, whereas otherwise you are looking at the embedded JPEG

If you open the NEF in non-Nikon software, eg Lightroom, some of the settings may be applied, eg sharpening (at least, Thom Hogan suggests this may be the case). So you might want to set shaprpening to 0.

Picture controls do not affect RAW, even when you open in CaptureNX. The settings might be displayed but you can undo them. The issue is that the Picture controls affect the processing to JPEG, even the embedded JPEG, and that all your camera information uses the JPEG, not the RAW file to display information.

So, your histograms and your highlight detector work off the (embedded) JPEG, not the RAW file. This can mislead you as you may think there is overexposure, while this is not the case.

Therefore, to answer your question: directly they do not affect your RAW file, but indirectly, they can by telling you to adjust exposure when that is in fact not needed.

Source: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/35631926

2. Lightroom and Pre-“Picture Control” Nikon DSLRs

Lightroom seems to only offer the “picture control” options in the camera calibration section and does not “recognize” the old way of setting image parameters.

In Lightroom, images taken with my pre-“picture control” camera are much different then if opened with View NX or Capture NX. They are so much off, in fact, that I have had to replace the smooth interface of LR with the clunkiness that is Capture NX. I would love to be able to use LR and have images look as close as possible to CNX or VNX but just could not tweak the colors to get close.

If you are shooting raw images then Lightroom will not read those cameras settings. That isn’t the way Lightroom is designed. Of course, they will always look different when viewed using Nikon’s Software because it will read all of those settings. If you want those settings included in your pictures in Lightroom then you will have to shoot JPEG.

The reason Lightroom will not read those settings on your camera or any other camera is because they are put in nonstandard places in the camera data. And Lightroom will not read those settings because they are different for every camera manufacturer. If you are looking for software that will read those settings then you’ll have to purchase software from Nikon.

The profiles that were mentioned are designed to match the corresponding camera settings, but the new picture styles I don’t think will ever be supported.

Source: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3242752

Adobe Lightroom Tips: Lightroom Export (Image Sizing)

After done working on our images in develop module, we might want to share it. Be it in prints, or to upload it on any website.

To go to export dialog, hit CTRL + Shit + E / CMD + Shift + E.

As we scroll down the menu, theres a title “Image Sizing”

This feature is pretty useful for us to determine what are the appropriate output for different usage.

Let’s say you and to export and share it on Facebook

Click on Resize To Fit and select dimension

I choose 2048 x 2048 pixel with resolution of 72.

Make Image format is set to JPEG sure in the “File Setting”  and select sRGB as your color space because most of the website recognize sRGB rather than AdobeRGB (1998). But if you do, the websites will automatically strips down the color space and change it with sRGB and there you will see the image might look slightly different than it suposed to be  when the image are uploaded.

Hit the export and now the image are ready to be uploaded to any website

Some stock images requires us to submit at least 4 megapixel image. In this case, go back to the Image Sizing in Export dialog.

Check the Resize to Fit and select Megapixel. And you know what to do after this step. 🙂

Just in case you want to export multiple image with different types of layout (landscape & portrait). It is a total mess to play around by specifying sizes in dimension, width & height. The trick here is to key in the long side for example 10×10 inch or you can try Long Edge or Short Edge, and this is going to put your nerves away.

Adobe Lightroom Tips: Viewing Before and After in Develop Module

Adobe Lightroom : Before and After

There are times where we want to see the different before and after we do some changes in our photo in Lightroom.  So here is the short and straight forward tips for you.

To view “before and after”, 1st you need is to make sure you’re inside “Develope Module”. The shortcut key for before and after is “Y”, or you can click on the tool bar and select “before and after”. If you can’t find the “before and after” button, it might be not being selected to be shown in the tool bar, click on the dropdown arrow on the further right at the tool bar section, select “view mode” and the icon will appear on the left hand side of the tool bar. You can show and hide the tool bar by pressing “T”.

There are few way to view before and after. Just click the dropdown arrow and select your preferred way for the preview.

Adobe Lightroom Tips: Viewing in Library Module (Grid & Loupe View)

This is the basic of viewing our photos in Adobe Lightroom, the Grid View and Loupe View. You might want to try the shortcut key for both veiwing mode, to view the photos in grid view, press G (both Windows & Mac).

Adobe Lightroom 3 | Grid View

You can adjust the increase/decrease thumbnail size by pressing “=” (increase) or “-” (decrease) – it work for both Windows & Mac.

If you want to view it more detail and bigger, press E (Loupe View).

You can actually expand Loupe view by hiding the side panels, filmstrip, module picker, and expand it to fullscreen viewing. Shortcut key for this is Ctrl + Shift + F (Windows) and Command + Shift + F (Mac)

Adobe Lightroom | Loupe View (Fullscreen)

Thank You Lightroom

Since few months ago, i’ve been using Lightroom 3 for managing my files & editing. I do edit in Photoshop CS5 to do things like removing unwanted spots, you can do exactly the same in Lightroom, but i prefer to take the advantage of content-aware provided in Photoshop CS5. If you haven’t try the Lightroom yet, i recommend you to give it a try as this particular software are actually designed for photographer. It actually provides faster workflow that gives you less time on pc/laptop but to have more time photographing instead.  For those are new to Lightroom, this is what i found in wikipedia what is Lightroom all about.

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom is a photography software program developed by Adobe Systems for Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows, designed to assist Adobe Photoshop users in managing large quantities of digital images and doing post production work. It is not a file browser like Adobe Bridge, but rather an image management application database which helps in viewing, editing, and managing digital photos, the same way photographers used to do in the non-digital world.”

I’ve been using Lightroom for few years now but only to take the benefit of the post-processing (Develop Module). My workflow was import – develop – export, but now i’m fully utilizing the services provided in it.

I’m now spent less time editing, and it just took me few seconds to find picture that i want be it in my laptop drive or external hard drive. Thanks for the intelligence of the file management in Lightroom.

Adobe Lightroom 3 | Library Interface

%d bloggers like this: