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Picture Control on Camera & Lightroom Preview

This issue has been occured to me for several years when i started using lightroom.

Did you notice that when we shoot in RAW and we did (for nikon) set picture control for example; Landscape, Vivid, Portrait, Monotone,.. etc, just after few second the imported those images in our lightroom library, it will become dull, but it appears to be fine (images with picture control setting) few seconds earlier?

If you never notice this before, try this:

1. Shoot in RAW with Monotone setting on Picture Control

2. Import images in Lightroom

3. You will notice, all images viewed in black and white as we see in our camera LCD

4. After done importing and collecting data of that image, Lightroom will generate their own preview which the black and white image to be replaced.

5. You should get what i mean by now ūüôā

I never bother this issue before, but i keep on wondering why does lightroom did not read the picture control setting. Here’s my findings:

1. Does Picture Control adjustment have any effect when shooting in raw mode?

No. The Picture Control settings are stored as metadata within the NEF file. If you open the NEF in Capture NX 2, then the values are applied, but of course you can change them. In ViewNX, I think you have to press the RAW button to see the full effects of any picture control settings.

I believe that pressing the RAW button opens the RAW image, whereas otherwise you are looking at the embedded JPEG

If you open the NEF in non-Nikon software, eg Lightroom, some of the settings may be applied, eg sharpening (at least, Thom Hogan suggests this may be the case). So you might want to set shaprpening to 0.

Picture controls do not affect RAW, even when you open in CaptureNX. The settings might be displayed but you can undo them. The issue is that the Picture controls affect the processing to JPEG, even the embedded JPEG, and that all your camera information uses the JPEG, not the RAW file to display information.

So, your histograms and your highlight detector work off the (embedded) JPEG, not the RAW file. This can mislead you as you may think there is overexposure, while this is not the case.

Therefore, to answer your question: directly they do not affect your RAW file, but indirectly, they can by telling you to adjust exposure when that is in fact not needed.

Source: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/35631926

2.¬†Lightroom and Pre-“Picture Control” Nikon DSLRs

Lightroom seems to only offer the “picture control” options in the camera calibration section and does not “recognize” the old way of setting image parameters.

In Lightroom, images taken with my pre-“picture control” camera are much different then if opened with View NX or Capture NX. They are so much off, in fact, that I have had to replace the smooth interface of LR with the clunkiness that is Capture NX. I would love to be able to use LR and have images look as close as possible to CNX or VNX but just could not tweak the colors to get close.

If you are shooting raw images then Lightroom will not read those cameras settings. That isn’t the way Lightroom is designed. Of course, they will always look different when viewed using Nikon’s Software because it will read all of those settings. If you want those settings included in your pictures in Lightroom then you will have to shoot JPEG.

The reason Lightroom will not read those settings on your camera or any other camera is because they are put in nonstandard places in the camera data. And Lightroom will not read those settings because they are different for every camera manufacturer. If you are looking for software that will read those settings then you’ll have to purchase software from Nikon.

The profiles that were mentioned are designed to match the corresponding camera settings, but the new picture styles I don’t think will ever be supported.

Source: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3242752

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Adobe Lightroom Tips: Viewing Before and After in Develop Module

Adobe Lightroom : Before and After

There are times where we want to see the different before and after we do some changes in our photo in Lightroom.  So here is the short and straight forward tips for you.

To view “before and after”, 1st you need is to make sure you’re inside “Develope Module”. The shortcut key for before and after is “Y”, or you can click on the tool bar and select “before and after”. If you can’t find the “before and after” button, it might be not being selected to be shown in the tool bar, click on the dropdown arrow on the further right at the tool bar section, select “view mode” and the icon will appear on the left hand side of the tool bar. You can show and hide the tool bar by pressing “T”.

There are few way to view before and after. Just click the dropdown arrow and select your preferred way for the preview.

Adobe Lightroom Tips: Viewing in Library Module (Grid & Loupe View)

This is the basic of viewing our photos in Adobe Lightroom, the Grid View and Loupe View. You might want to try the shortcut key for both veiwing mode, to view the photos in grid view, press G (both Windows & Mac).

Adobe Lightroom 3 | Grid View

You can adjust the increase/decrease¬†thumbnail size by pressing “=” (increase) or “-” (decrease) – it work for both Windows & Mac.

If you want to view it more detail and bigger, press E (Loupe View).

You can actually expand Loupe view by hiding the side panels, filmstrip, module picker, and expand it to fullscreen viewing. Shortcut key for this is Ctrl + Shift + F (Windows) and Command + Shift + F (Mac)

Adobe Lightroom | Loupe View (Fullscreen)

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